Skip to content

Sbir 13 1 Topics For Persuasive Essays

Given EPA’s broad mission of protecting human health and the environment, it faces a broad range of problems that need solution and for which innovative technologies could help provide solutions. Each year EPA’s SBIR program selects from this broad range of problems a number of specific topics to include in its Phase I solicitation. The highest priority needs are identified and then the topics are written to address those needs. Many of the topics address more than one need – e.g., water and homeland security, and indoor air quality and reducing toxicity of

materials. Agency strategy documents, multi-year plans, peer-reviewed research needs assessment and other materials are used in identifying the highest needs and in crafting the topics.

For this solicitation, the EPA’s needs are being expressed through a variety of very specific topics. Offerors must directly address and select just one of the specific topics described below.

  • Air and Climate‌

    Formaldehyde Sensor

    Formaldehyde is a colorless, flammable gas at room temperature that has a strong odor. Indoor exposure can result from formaldehyde emissions from composite wood products, building materials, insulation, glues, paints and coatings, permanent press fabrics, cosmetics, dishwashing liquids, gas stoves, kerosene heaters, and cigarette smoke (https://www.epa.gov/formaldehyde/facts-about-formaldehyde).

    Exposure to formaldehyde can cause adverse health effects, including (at 0.1-0.5 ppm) nasal and eye irritation, neurological effects, and increased risk of asthma and/or allergy, and (at 0.6-1.9 ppm) eczema and changes in lung function (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tf.asp?id=219&tid=39). Formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen (http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/substances/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-fact-sheet).

    Exposure to formaldehyde can be reduced by opening windows, using fans to bring in outside air, and removing and/or avoiding products that are sources of formaldehyde emissions. Having a low-cost formaldehyde sensor would enable people to know when mitigation measures are warranted and how effective they are. As a result, EPA is seeking the development and commercialization of such sensors.

    Topic Code 1A: Inexpensive Indoor Formaldehyde Sensor. Develop a simple sensor that can be used in homes and other indoor settings to detect formaldehyde at concentrations in air of 0.05-5.0+ ppm plus or minus 0.01 ppm. The sensor should be hand-held, have internal (downloadable) electronic data storage (be capable of storing at least 2,000 one minute data points), have data calibration capabilities, be able to operate for a minimum of 8 hours, and cost no more than $100.

    Methane Sensor

    Methane emissions from human activity are the second largest source of greenhouse gases emitted in the US. Pound for pound the impact of methane on climate change is more than 25 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. The largest sources of methane emissions are natural gas and petroleum systems, domestic livestock, and landfills for waste from homes and businesses (https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/gases/ch4.html). There is significant potential to reduce these emissions (https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/Downloads/EPAactivities/Non_CO2_US_Summary_Report_SinglePg.pdf)

    . The US government has supported a number of such efforts—e.g., through the Global Methane Initiative (https://www.epa.gov/gmi). In May 2016, EPA issued a new source performance standard to reduce methane emissions from new, reconstructed, and modified sources in the oil and gas industry (https://www3.epa.gov/airquality/oilandgas/actions.html).

    Identifying fugitive emissions from these sources can be an important step toward leak reduction and other mitigation measures. A methane sensor that could readily and affordably make such measurements in the field would have great utility. As a result, EPA is seeking the development and commercialization of sensors that can detect methane emissions from landfills, oil and gas operations and facilities, livestock operations, and natural gas distribution systems.

    Topic Code 1B: Low-Cost Sensor for Identifying Fugitive Methane Emissions. Develop a sensor that can detect methane at concentrations in air of 2-250 ppm plus or minus 2 ppm. It should be hand- held and provide continuous readouts (it should not require collection of a sample that would be sent to a laboratory for analysis), provide electronic transmittal of the data, have data storage and calibration capabilities, and cost no more than $100 and preferably less than $50.

  • Manufacturing‌

    Greener Plastics

    Executive Order 13329 directs the EPA to properly and effectively assist the private sector in its manufacturing innovation in order to sustain a strong manufacturing sector in the U.S. economy. These innovations often involve engineering and technical solutions that make the manufacturing operation and/or the manufactured product both more environmentally and economically sound.

    The EPA is seeking the development and commercialization of innovative technologies that, when compared with currently available technologies, have dramatically better performance, decreased cost of production, and reduced environmental impacts in both production and use.

    The production, use, recycle/reuse, and disposal of plastic materials and products pose significant environmental and human health problems. The EPA is seeking innovative greener manufacturing of plastics and greener plastic materials and products.

    Topic Code 2A: Greener Manufacturing of Plastics. Develop for a specific plastic or family of plastics that has significant negative public health and environmental impacts an improved manufacturing process that

    (a) eliminates the use of one or more toxic chemicals in the process, (b) greatly reduces the amount of energy used to carry out the process, and/or (c) eliminates one or more toxic pollutants that currently result from the process. Comparison with the currently used manufacturing process and assessing the overall life cycle of the plastic(s) are integral to this topic.

    Topic Code 2B: Greener Plastic Materials and Products. Develop for a specific plastic or family of plastics that has significant negative public health and environmental impacts alternative materials and products that (a) do not emit toxic fumes, (b) are not toxic if ingested, (c) rapidly biodegrade in soil and water, and/or (d) are easily recycled and reused. Comparison with the performance and cost of the currently-used plastic materials and products and assessing their overall life cycle are integral to this topic.

  • Toxic Chemicals‌

    Cleaner Manufacturing of Dyes, Paints and Inks

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have extreme environmental persistence, the ability to bioaccumulate, and adverse human health effects (https://www.epa.gov/pcbs). They were used as insulation fluids in electrical

    transformers and generators, as fluorescent lamp ballast, and in caulk. In 1979 the US banned their production under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

    PCBs continue to be generated and released into the environment as the unintended by-products of the manufacturing of certain dyes, paints, and inks (http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/121-a86/).

    Studies have detected these PCBs in waterways across the U.S. and attribute their presence to this manufacturing by-product. This pollution source is causing water impairment and resulting in challenges to states and other entities in meeting water quality standards.

    The EPA would like to see the development and use of dye, paint, and ink manufacturing processes that do not produce PCBs, as follows.

    Topic Code 3A: Cleaner Manufacturing Processes for Dyes, Paints, and Inks. Develop cleaner manufacturing processes for dyes, paints, and inks that do not create unintentional undesirable by- products including PCBs. These proposed processes should also consider other lifecycle impacts of their manufacturing process including toxicity of feedstocks, energy consumption/carbon emissions, and end of life, etc.

    Understanding the Chemical Composition of Consumer Products

    Understanding human exposure to chemicals is central to EPA’s mission of protecting human health and the environment, but the lack of information on chemical safety remains an issue (https://www.epa.gov/chemical-research). In particular, there is a lack of information on exposure to toxic chemicals used in consumer products. This information gap could potentially be addressed through a citizen science approach by helping consumers understand and be aware of the toxic chemicals in the products they consider purchasing and to consider that information in their buying decisions. In order to increase awareness of human exposure to chemicals in consumer products, EPA is looking for:

    Topic Code 3B: Novel Technologies to Help Consumers Understand the Chemical Composition of Consumer Products. Development of technologies that could scan product Universal Product Codes (UPC) codes to inform users of what chemicals are in the products that are of interest to health reasons (e.g., allergens such as nuts or chemicals of concern such as food dyes or Bisphenol A (BPA)). The technology could also indicate whether the products fall into certain categories (e.g., “organic” or “safer choice” https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice). The technology could calculate daily exposure based on typical product usage and other information of value to the consumer. The technology should be geared toward priority chemicals of interest to the EPA, which include endocrine disrupting compounds and phthalates. It should also address commercial sectors of interest to EPA, including consumer care products, cleaning products, and food and beverages.

  • Water‌

    Water Treatment and Infrastructure

    The Office of Water (OW) has the goal of being a catalyst for fostering the protection and sustainability of water resources in the U.S. and around the globe. It has produced two papers that are intended to help achieve this goal. The first is the March 27, 2013, “Blueprint for Integrating Technology Innovation into the National Water

    Program.” The second is the April 2014 “Promoting Technology Innovation for Clean and Safe Water: WaterTechnology Innovation Blueprint—Version 2” (EPA 820-R-14-006). These papers identify 10 market opportunities for technology innovation. The following topics in the general areas of drinking water treatment, water infrastructure and point of use water monitoring, address these opportunities.

    Topic Code 4A: Non-Reverse Osmosis Based Desalination Units for Small Communities: Develop non-reverse osmosis based desalination units that can provide sufficient potable water to meet the needs of small communities (those under 10,000 population). The units should be scalable for producing from 100,000 to 1,000,000 gallons per day of potable water. The units should be able to desalinate seawater and brackish water. They should be able to treat water that also contains other chemicals, biological materials, and organic and non-organic materials. They should be able to operate on a continuous

    basis. They should be small, sturdy, highly resistant to corrosion and other degradation processes, easy to operate and maintain, long-lasting, use little energy, and be affordable in terms of capital and operating costs.

    Topic Code 4B: Non-Toxic Coatings for Water Pipes that Prevent the Growth of Biofilms, Corrosion, Scaling, and Leaching of Lead: Develop non-toxic coatings (not inserts or sleeves) for the inside of water pipes that prevent the growth of biofilms, prevent corrosion and scaling, and prevent the leaching of lead from the pipes. The coatings should be easy to apply as retro-fits. They should be applicable to any size pipe. They should be resistant to scrapes and tears, long-lasting, and affordable.

    Lead Test for Tap Water

    There are many possible sources of lead in homes—e.g., lead paint, dust, pharmaceuticals, toys, dishes, and glasses. In addition, drinking water can contain lead from lead pipes and natural sources. Lead can cause serious health effects with young children being the most susceptible (https://www.epa.gov/lead).

    While there is no safe level of lead in drinking water, EPA has set an “action level” of 0.015 milligrams per liter (mg/l), which is equal to 15 parts per billion (ppb) (https://www.epa.gov/your-drinking-water/table-regulated-drinking-water-contaminants). If someone finds that they have greater than this concentration of lead in their tap water, they can flush their line before use, only use cold water for eating and cooking, use a water filter, or use bottled water. They should also contact their water provider or local health department. If a water utility finds that more than 10% of sampled households exceed this level, it must take action to reduce the lead concentration throughout the system.

    There are test kits on the market for measuring lead in tap water, but often they are expensive, require sending a water sample to a laboratory for analysis, and/or are not accurate. There is a need for a simple, inexpensive means for people to determine the level of lead in their tap water. It could, for example, be a strip of paper or plastic that turns from green to red when the concentration at the tap exceeds the action level.

    Topic Code 4C: Simple Lead Test for Tap Water in Homes. Develop an extremely simple test strip that will indicate whether the lead concentration in tap water exceeds the EPA action level. The strip should give a visual determination within 30 seconds, cost less than $2 per strip, be stable for at least 5 years when stored, and be accurate to within plus or minus 0.5 ppb of the action level of 15 ppb.

  • Water and Homeland Security‌

    EPA has been designated as the lead homeland security agency for water and is responsible for protecting water systems. A specific area of interest is innovative technologies that can prevent the trapping by and adhesion of contaminants to the inside of pipe walls or other such surfaces in the event that a drinking water system becomes contaminated. To achieve this goal EPA is interested in supporting the development and commercialization of the following innovative technology.

    Topic Code 5A: Water Pipes that Prevent the Growth of Biofilms, Prevent Corrosion and Scaling, and Do Not Contain Lead: Develop water pipes that due to their composition alone (i.e., without the use of coatings or other surface treatment) prevent the growth of biofilms, prevent corrosion and scaling, and do not contain lead. The pipes should be lighter, stronger, more resistant to breaking, longer lasting, easier to install and maintain, and cost no more than currently used water pipes.

  • Greener Buildings‌

    Interior Construction Materials

    Floors, walls, and ceilings of homes are often made with materials that emit formaldehyde and other organic pollutants that are toxic to the people who live there. Developing non-toxic materials that can perform equally well in these interior construction applications will reduce the exposure to toxic off-gases by the residents. With this in mind, EPA is interested in supporting the development and commercialization of innovative technologies that address the following topic.

    Topic Code 6A: Non-Toxic Interior Construction Materials for Homes: Develop non-toxic alternatives for materials commonly used in the composition of floors, walls, and/or ceilings in homes. The technology must be affordable and at least as rugged and long-lasting as currently used materials.

    Exterior Construction Materials

    The exterior of buildings could be constructed with greener materials. They could include, for example, solar skins that produce energy for the building, cladding made with materials that are non-toxic, structural elements that weigh less and have less volume, materials that are easily re-cycled and re-used and do not leave parts that have to be sent to landfills or otherwise disposed, etc. As a result, there is a need for the development and commercialization of the following:

    Topic Code 6B: Greener Exterior Construction Materials: Develop construction materials for the exterior of buildings that are greener throughout their life cycle than currently used exterior construction materials. For example, the materials they are made of should be non-toxic, result from less polluting manufacturing processes than currently used, be easier to re-cycle and re-use than currently used materials. They should be stronger; more durable; last longer; weigh less; have lower volume; and cost less to produce, use in construction, re-cycle and re-use, and dispose than currently used materials.

    Comparison with currently-used materials and a life cycle perspective are integral to this topic.

  • DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY (DARPA)

    14.1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)

     

    PHASE I Proposal Submission Instructions Pages 1-6

    Phase II/Direct to Phase II Proposal Instructions Pages 7-22

     

    1.1 INTRODUCTION

     

    DARPA's mission is to prevent technological surprise for the United States and to create technological surprise for its adversaries.  The DARPA SBIR and STTR Programs are designed to provide small, high-tech businesses and academic institutions the opportunity to propose radical, innovative, high-risk approaches to address existing and emerging national security threats; thereby supporting DARPA's overall strategy to bridge the gap between fundamental discoveries and the provision of new military capabilities.

     

    The responsibility for implementing DARPA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program rests with the Small Business Programs Office.

     

    DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY

    Attention: DIRO/SBPO

    675 North Randolph Street

    Arlington, VA  22203-2114

    (703) 526-4170

    Home Page http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/SBIR_STTR/SBIR_STTR.aspx

     

    Offerors responding to the DARPA topics listed in Section 12.0 of the DoD 14.1SBIR Solicitation must follow all the instructions provided in the DoD Program Solicitation.  Specific DARPA requirements in addition to or that deviate from the DoD Program Solicitation are provided below and reference the appropriate section of the DoD Solicitation.

     

    2.0 SPECIFIC DARPA REQUIREMENTS

     

    The solicitation has been EXTENSIVELY rewritten and follows the changes of the SBIR reauthorization. Please read the entire DoD solicitation and DARPA instructions carefully prior to submitting your proposal. Please go to http://content.govdelivery.com/bulletins/gd/USSBA-4cada5# to read the SBIR Policy Directive issued by the Small Business Administration.

     

    3.0 DEFINITIONS

     

    3.1 Export Control

     

    The following will apply to all projects with military or dual-use applications that develop beyond fundamental research (basic and applied research ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community):

     

    (1) The Contractor shall comply with all U. S. export control laws and regulations, including the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 through 130, and the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), 15 CFR Parts 730 through 799, in the performance of this contract.  In the absence of available license exemptions/exceptions, the Contractor shall be responsible for obtaining the appropriate licenses or other approvals, if required, for exports of (including deemed exports) hardware, technical data, and software, or for the provision of technical assistance.

     

    (2) The Contractor shall be responsible for obtaining export licenses, if required, before utilizing foreign persons in the performance of this contract, including instances where the work is to be performed on-site at any Government installation (whether in or outside the United States), where the foreign person will have access to export-controlled technologies, including technical data or software.

     

    (3) The Contractor shall be responsible for all regulatory record keeping requirements associated with the use of licenses and license exemptions/exceptions.

     

    (4) The Contractor shall be responsible for ensuring that the provisions of this clause apply to its subcontractors.

     

    Please visit http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/itar.html for more detailed information regarding ITAR requirements.

     

    3.2 Foreign National

     

    ALL offerors proposing to use foreign nationals MUST follow Section 5.4, c, (8) of the DoD Program Solicitation and disclose this information regardless of whether the topic is subject to ITAR restrictions. Please note: A foreign national is anyone who is NOT a U.S. citizen.  There are two primary sources of citizenship: birthright citizenship and naturalization.  Additional information regarding U.S citizenship is available at http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship_782.html.

     

    4.0 PROPOSAL FUNDAMENTALS

     

    Small Businesses will receive a notification for each proposal submitted. Please read each notification carefully and note the proposal number and topic number referenced.  All communication from the DARPA will originate from the sbir@darpa.mil e-mail address.  Please white-list this address in your company's spam filters to ensure timely receipt of communications from our office.

     

    4.1 Classified Proposals

     

    DARPA topics are unclassified; however, the subject matter may be considered to be a "critical technology" and therefore subject to ITAR restrictions.  See Export Control requirements above in Section 3.1.

     

    4.2 Debriefing

     

    DARPA will provide a debriefing to the offeror in accordance with FAR Subpart 15.5.  The notification letter referenced below (Information on Proposal Status) will provide instructions for requesting a proposal debriefing.

     

    4.3 Notification of Proposal Receipt

     

    After the solicitation closing date, the person listed as the "Corporate Official" on the Proposal Coversheet will receive an e-mail with instructions for retrieving a proposal acknowledgement receipt from the DARPA SBIR/STTR Information Portal.

     

    4.4 Information on Proposal Status

     

    Once the source selection is complete, the person listed as the "Corporate Official" on the Proposal Coversheet will receive an email with instructions for retrieving a letter of selection or non-selection from the DARPA SBIR/STTR Information Portal.

     

    4.5 Phase I Award Information

     

    1. Number of Phase I Awards.  The number of Phase I awards will be consistent with DARPA's budget, the number of anticipated awards for interim Phase I modifications, and the number of anticipated Phase II contracts.  No Phase I contracts will be awarded until evaluation of all qualified proposals for a specific topic is completed. Normally proposing firms will be notified of selection or non-selection status for a Phase I award within 90 days of the closing date for this solicitation.  Selections are posted at www.dodsbir.net/selections.
    2. Type of Funding Agreement.  DARPA Phase I awards will be Firm Fixed Price contracts.
    3. Dollar Value.  DARPA Phase I awards shall not exceed $100,000 for the base effort and shall not exceed $50,000 for the option if exercised.
    4. Timing.  Across DoD, the median time between the date that the SBIR solicitation closes and the award of a Phase I contract is approximately four months.

     

    5.0 PHASE I PROPOSAL

     

    5.1 Phase I Option

     

    DARPA has implemented the use of a Phase I Option that may be exercised to fund interim Phase I activities while a Phase II contract is being negotiated.  Only Phase I companies selected for Phase II will be eligible to exercise the Phase I Option.  The Phase I Option covers activities over a period of up to four months and should describe appropriate initial Phase II activities that may lead to the successful demonstration of a product or technology. The statement of work for the Phase I Option counts toward the 20-page limit for the Technical Volume.

     

    A Phase I Cost Volume ($150,000 maximum) must be submitted in detail online via the DoD SBIR/STTR submission system. Proposers that participate in this solicitation must complete the Phase I Cost Volume, not to exceed the maximum dollar amount of $100,000, and a Phase I Option Cost Volume, not to exceed the maximum dollar amount of $50,000.  Phase I awards and options are subject to the availability of funds.

     

    Offerors are REQUIRED to use the online Cost Volume for the Phase I and Phase I Option costs (available on the DoD SBIR/STTR submission site).

     

    5.2 Technical Assistance

     

    In accordance with the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 632), DARPA will authorize the recipient of a Phase I SBIR award to purchase technical assistance services, such as access to a network of scientists and engineers engaged in a wide range of technologies, or access to technical and business literature available through on-line data bases, for the purpose of assisting such concerns in—

    1. making better technical decisions concerning such projects;
    2. solving technical problems which arise during the conduct of such projects;
    3. minimizing technical risks associated with such projects; and
    4. developing and commercializing new commercial products and processes resulting from such projects.

     

    If you are interested in proposing use of a vendor for technical assistance, you must provide a cost breakdown in the Cost Volume under "Other Direct Costs (ODCs)" and provide a one page description of the vendor you will use and the technical assistance you will receive.  The proposed amount may not exceed $5,000 and the description should be included as the LAST page of the Technical Volume.  This description will not count against the 20-page limit and will NOT be evaluated.  Approval of technical assistance is not guaranteed and is subject to review of the contracting officer.

     

    5.3 Human or Animal Subject Research

     

    DARPA discourages offerors from proposing to conduct Human or Animal Subject Research during Phase I due to the significant lead time required to prepare the documentation and obtain approval, which will delay the Phase 1 award.

     

    5.4 Commercialization Strategy

     

    DARPA is equally interested in dual use commercialization of SBIR project results to the U.S. military, the private sector market, or both, and expects explicit discussion of key activities to achieve this result in the commercialization strategy part of the proposal. The discussion should include identification of the problem, need, or requirement relevant to a Department of Defense application and/or a private sector application that the SBIR project results would address; a description of how wide-spread and significant the problem, need, or requirement is; and identification of the potential DoD end-users, Federal customers, and/or private sector customers who would likely use the technology.

     

    Technology commercialization and transition from Research and Development activities to fielded systems within the DoD is challenging. Phase I is the time to plan for and begin transition and commercialization activities.  The small business must convey an understanding of the preliminary transition path or paths to be established during the Phase I project.  That plan should include the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) expected at the end of the Phase I.  The plan should include anticipated business model and potential private sector and federal partners the company has identified to support transition and commercialization activities.  In addition, key proposed milestones anticipated during Phase II such as: prototype development, laboratory and systems testing, integration, testing in operational environment, and demonstrations.

     

    5.5 Phase I Proposal Checklist:

     

    The following criteria must be met or your proposal may be REJECTED.

     

    ____1.  Include a header with company name, proposal number and topic number to each page of your technical volume.

    ____2.  Include tasks to be completed during the option period and include the costs in the cost volume.

    ____3.  Break out subcontractor, material and travel costs in detail.  Use the "Explanatory Material Field" in the DoD cost volume for this information, if necessary.

    ____4.  The base effort does not exceed $100,000 and six months and the option does not exceed $50,000 and four months.  The costs for the base and option are clearly separate, and identified on the Proposal Cover Sheet, in the cost volume, and in the statement of work section of the technical volume.

    ____5.  The technical volume does not exceed twenty (20) pages. Any page beyond 20 will be redacted prior to evaluations.

    ____6.  Upload the Volume 1: Proposal Cover Sheet; Volume 2: Technical Volume; Volume 3: Cost Volume; and Volume 4: Company Commercialization Report electronically through the DoD submission site by 6:00 AM (ET) on January 22, 2014.

    ____7.  After uploading your file on the DoD submission site, review it to ensure that all pages have transferred correctly and do not contain unreadable characters.  Contact the DoD Help Desk immediately with any problems.

     

    6.0 PHASE I EVALUATION CRITERIA

     

    The offeror's attention is directed to the fact that non-Government advisors to the Government may review and provide support in proposal evaluations during source selection.  Non-government advisors may have access to the offeror's proposals, may be utilized to review proposals, and may provide comments and recommendations to the Government's decision makers.  These advisors will not establish final assessments of risk and will not rate or rank offeror's proposals.  They are also expressly prohibited from competing for DARPA SBIR or STTR awards in the SBIR/STTR topics they review and/or provide comments on to the Government.  All advisors are required to comply with procurement integrity laws and are required to sign Non-Disclosure and Rules of Conduct/Conflict of Interest statements.  Non-Government technical consultants/experts will not have access to proposals that are labeled by their proposers as "Government Only".

     

    Please note that qualified advocacy letters will count towards the proposal page limit and will be evaluated towards criterion C.  Advocacy letters are not required for Phase I.  Consistent with Section 3-209 of DoD 5500.7-R, Joint Ethics Regulation, which as a general rule prohibits endorsement and preferential treatment of a non-federal entity, product, service or enterprise by DoD or DoD employees in their official capacities, letters from government personnel will NOT be considered during the evaluation process.

     

    A qualified advocacy letter is from a relevant commercial procuring organization(s) working with a DoD or other Federal entity, articulating their pull for the technology (i.e., what need the technology supports and why it is important to fund it), and possible commitment to provide additional funding and/or insert the technology in their acquisition/sustainment program. If submitted, the letter should be included as the last page of your technical upload.  Advocacy letters which are faxed or e-mailed separately will NOT be considered.

     

    6.1 Limitations on Funding

     

    DARPA reserves the right to select and fund only those proposals considered to be of superior quality and highly relevant to the DARPA mission.  As a result, DARPA may fund multiple proposals in a topic area, or it may not fund any proposals in a topic area.

     

    7.0 PHASE II PROPOSAL

     

    All firms awarded a Phase I contract under this solicitation will receive a notification letter with instructions for preparing and submitting a Phase II Proposal and a deadline for submission. Visit http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/SBIR_STTR/SBIR_Program.aspx for more information regarding the Phase II proposal process. Firms proposing a Direct to Phase II under the 14.1 Solicitation should continue to page 7 of these instructions.

     

    8.0 CONTRACTUAL CONSIDERATIONS

     

    8.1 Publication Approval (Public Release)

     

    NSDD 189 established the national policy for controlling the flow of scientific, technical, and engineering information produced in federally funded fundamental research at colleges, universities, and laboratories. The directive defines fundamental research as follows: ''Fundamental research' means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reasons."

     

    It is DARPA's goal to eliminate pre-publication review and other restrictions on fundamental research except in those exceptional cases when it is in the best interest of national security. Please visit http://www.darpa.mil/NewsEvents/Public_Release_Center/Public_Release_Center.aspx for additional information and applicable publication approval procedures.  Visit http://dtsn.darpa.mil/fundamentalresearch/ to verify whether or not your award has a pre-publication review requirement.

     

    8.2 Phase I Reports

     

    All DARPA Phase I awardees are required to submit reports in accordance with the Contract Data Requirements List – CDRL and any applicable Contract Line Item Number (CLIN) of the Phase I contract.  Reports must be provided to the individuals identified in Exhibit A of the contract.
    DIRECT TO PHASE II INSTRUCTIONS

    (Phase I Instructions on Page 1)

    1.1 INTRODUCTION

     

    DARPA's mission is to prevent technological surprise for the United States and to create technological surprise for its adversaries.  The DARPA SBIR and STTR Programs are designed to provide small, high-tech businesses and academic institutions the opportunity to propose radical, innovative, high-risk approaches to address existing and emerging national security threats; thereby supporting DARPA's overall strategy to bridge the gap between fundamental discoveries and the provision of new military capabilities.

     

    The responsibility for implementing DARPA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program rests with the Small Business Programs Office.

     

    DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY

    Attention: DIRO/SBPO

    675 North Randolph Street

    Arlington, VA  22203-2114

    (703) 526-4170

    Home Page http://www.darpa.mil/Opportunities/SBIR_STTR/SBIR_STTR.aspx

     

    Offerors responding to the DARPA topics listed in Section 12.0 of the DoD 14.1SBIR Solicitation must follow all the instructions provided in the DoD Program Solicitation.  Specific DARPA requirements in addition to or that deviate from the DoD Program Solicitation are provided below and reference the appropriate section of the DoD Solicitation.

     

    2.0 DEFINITIONS

     

    2.1 Export Control

     

    The following will apply to all projects with military or dual-use applications that develop beyond fundamental research (basic and applied research ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community):

     

    (1) The Contractor shall comply with all U. S. export control laws and regulations, including the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 through 130, and the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), 15 CFR Parts 730 through 799, in the performance of this contract.  In the absence of available license exemptions/exceptions, the Contractor shall be responsible for obtaining the appropriate licenses or other approvals, if required, for exports of (including deemed exports) hardware, technical data, and software, or for the provision of technical assistance.

     

    (2) The Contractor shall be responsible for obtaining export licenses, if required, before utilizing foreign persons in the performance of this contract, including instances where the work is to be performed on-site at any Government installation (whether in or outside the United States), where the foreign person will have access to export-controlled technologies, including technical data or software.

     

    (3) The Contractor shall be responsible for all regulatory record keeping requirements associated with the use of licenses and license exemptions/exceptions.

     

    (4) The Contractor shall be responsible for ensuring that the provisions of this clause apply to its subcontractors.  Please visit http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/regulations_laws/itar.html for more detailed information regarding ITAR requirements.

     

    2.2 Foreign National

     

    ALL offerors proposing to use foreign nationals MUST follow Section 5.4, c, (8) of the DoD Program Solicitation and disclose this information regardless of whether the topic is subject to ITAR restrictions.  Please note: A foreign national is anyone who is NOT a U.S. citizen.  There are two primary sources of citizenship: birthright citizenship and naturalization.  Additional information regarding U.S citizenship is available at http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship_782.html.

     

    2.3 Human and/or Animal Use

     

    Your topic may have been identified by the program manager as research involving Human and/or Animal Use. In accordance with DoD policy, human and/or animal subjects in research conducted or supported by DARPA shall be protected. Although these protocols were most likely not needed to carry out the Phase I, significant lead time is required to prepare the documentation and obtain approval in order to avoid delay of the Phase II award. Please visit http://www.darpa.mil/sbpo/docs/SBIR_STTRs_Human_Animal.pdf to review the Human and Animal Use PowerPoint presentation(s) to understand what is required to comply with human and/or animal protocols.

    1. Human Use: All research involving human subjects, to include use of human biological specimens and human data, selected for funding must comply with the federal regulations for human subject protection. Further, research involving human subjects that is conducted or supported by the DoD must comply with 32 CFR 219, Protection of Human Subjects (http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_07/32cfr219_07.html) and DoD Directive 3216.02, Protection of Human Subjects and Adherence to Ethical Standards in DoD-Supported Research (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/321602p.pdf).

    ·         Institutions awarded funding for research involving human subjects must provide documentation of a current Assurance of Compliance with Federal regulations for human subject protection, for example a Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Human Research Protection Federal Wide Assurance (http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp). All institutions engaged in human subject research, to include subcontractors, must also have a valid Assurance. In addition, personnel involved in human subjects research must provide documentation of completing appropriate training for the protection of human subjects.

    ·         For all proposed research that will involve human subjects in the first year or phase of the project, the institution must provide evidence of or a plan for review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB) upon final proposal submission to DARPA. The IRB conducting the review must be the IRB identified on the institution's Assurance. The protocol, separate from the proposal, must include a detailed description of the research plan, study population, risks and benefits of study participation, recruitment and consent process, data collection, and data analysis. Consult the designated IRB for guidance on writing the protocol. The informed consent document must comply with federal regulations (32 CFR 219.116). A valid Assurance along with evidence of appropriate training for all investigators should accompany the protocol for review by the IRB.

    ·         In addition to a local IRB approval, a headquarters-level human subjects regulatory review and approval is required for all research conducted or supported by the DoD. The Army, Navy or Air Force office responsible for managing the award can provide guidance and information about their component's headquarters-level review process. Note that confirmation of a current Assurance and appropriate human subjects protection training is required before headquarters-level approval can be issued.

    ·         The amount of time required to complete the IRB review/approval process may vary depending on the complexity of the research and/or the level of risk to study participants. Ample time should be allotted to complete the approval process. The IRB approval process can last between one to three months, followed by a DoD review that could last between three to six months. No DoD/DARPA funding can be used towards human subjects research until ALL approvals are granted.

     

    1. Animal Use: Any Recipient performing research, experimentation, or testing involving the use of animals shall comply with the rules on animal acquisition, transport, care, handling and use in: (i) 9 CFR parts 1-4, Department of Agriculture rules that implement the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act of 1966, as amended, (7 U.S.C. 2131-2159); (ii) the guidelines described in National Institutes of Health Publication No. 86-23, "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals"; (iii) DoD Directive 3216.01, "Use of Laboratory Animals in DoD Program."

    ·         For submissions containing animal use, proposals should briefly describe plans for Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) review and approval. Animal studies in the program will be expected to comply with the PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/olaw/olaw.htm.

    ·         All Recipients must receive approval by a DoD certified veterinarian, in addition to an IACUC approval. No animal studies may be conducted using DoD/DARPA funding until the USAMRMC Animal Care and Use Review Office (ACURO) or other appropriate DoD veterinary office(s) grant approval. As a part of this secondary review process, the Recipient will be required to complete and submit an ACURO Animal Use Appendix, which may be found at:

    https://mrmc-www.army.mil/index.cfm?pageid=Research_Protections.acuro&rn=1.

     

    3.0 PROPOSAL FUNDAMENTALS

     

    Small Businesses will receive a notification for each proposal submitted. Please read each notification carefully and note the proposal number and topic number referenced.  All communication from the DARPA will originate from the mailto:sbir@darpa.mil e-mail address.  Please white-list this address in your company's spam filters to ensure timely receipt of communications from our office.

     

    3.1 Classified Proposals

     

    DARPA topics are unclassified; however, the subject matter may be considered to be a "critical technology" and therefore subject to ITAR restrictions.  See Export Control requirements above in Section 2.1.

     

    3.2 Debriefing

     

    DARPA will provide a debriefing to the offeror in accordance with FAR Subpart 15.5.  The notification letter referenced below (Information on Proposal Status) will provide instructions for requesting a proposal debriefing.

     

     

     

     

    3.3 Notification of Proposal Receipt

     

    After the solicitation closing date, the person listed as the "Corporate Official" on the Proposal Coversheet will receive an e-mail with instructions for retrieving a proposal acknowledgement receipt from the DARPA SBIR/STTR Information Portal.

     

    3.4 Information on Proposal Status

     

    Once the source selection is complete, the person listed as the "Corporate Official" on the Proposal Coversheet will receive an email with instructions for retrieving a letter of selection or non-selection from the DARPA SBIR/STTR Information Portal.

     

    3.5 Phase II Award Information

     

    1. Number of Phase II Awards. The number of Phase II awards will depend upon the results of the Phase I efforts and the availability of funds. DARPA reserves the right to select and fund only those proposals considered to be of superior quality and highly relevant to the DARPA mission. As a result, DARPA may fund multiple proposals in a topic area, or it may not fund any proposals in a topic area.
    2. Type of Funding Agreement. DARPA Phase II awards are typically Cost‐Plus‐Fixed‐Fee contracts.

    ·         Offerors that choose to collaborate with a University must highlight the research activities that are being performed by the University and verify that the work is FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH.

    ·         Offerors are strongly encouraged to implement a government acceptable cost accounting system during the Phase I project to avoid delay in receiving a Phase II award. Phase II contractors MUST have an acceptable system to record and control costs, including procedures for job costing and time record keeping. Items such as overhead and G&A rates WILL require logical supporting documentation during the DCAA review process. Visit www.dcaa.mil and download the "Information for Contractors" guide for more information.

    ·         Offerors that are unable to obtain a positive DCAA review of their accounting system, may on a case-by-case basis, at the discretion of the Contracting Officer, be awarded a Firm Fixed Price Phase II contract or an Other Transaction (OT). Visit http://www.darpa.mil/sbpo/ot/index.html for more information on Other Transactions.

    1. Average Dollar Value. The table under section 4.7 (d) provides the applicable Phase II funding

    threshold for solicitations 12.3 through 14.B. If your Phase I award originated from a solicitation that is not listed, you may look up prior solicitations here: http://www.acq.osd.mil/osbp/sbir/solicitations/archives.shtml.

    1. Timing. Across DoD, the median time between DoD's receipt of a Phase II proposal and the award of a Phase II contract is six months when the firm has an adequate accounting system.

     

    4.0 PHASE II PROPOSAL

     

    4.1 Introduction

     

    The DoD electronic submission site (www.dodsbir.net/submission) is designed to reduce the time and cost required to prepare a formal proposal. Carefully review the guidance on allowable content.

     

    A complete proposal consists of four volumes:

    Volume 1: Proposal Cover Sheet

    Volume 2: Technical Volume

    Volume 3: Cost Volume

    Volume 4: Company Commercialization Report

     

    The electronic submission site provides a structure for providing these four sections but the offeror must begin entering its proposal by providing information for the Proposal Cover Sheet.

     

    After the offeror saves the draft Proposal Cover Sheet, the system will assign a proposal number. Please make note of this proposal number and print it for future reference. Remember to click the "Submit" button when you are done preparing your proposal. It is the offeror's responsibility to verify that the Technical Volume does not exceed the page limit after upload to the DoD SBIR/STTR Submission site by clicking on the "Verify Technical Volume" icon.

     

    4.2 Proposal Provisions

     

    Submitting Identical/Similar Proposals

     

    IMPORTANT -- While it is permissible, with proposal notification, to submit identical proposals or proposals containing a significant amount of essentially equivalent work for consideration under numerous federal program solicitations, it is unlawful to enter into contracts or grants requiring essentially equivalent effort. If there is any question concerning this, it must be disclosed to the soliciting agency or agencies as early as possible. If a proposal submitted for a Phase II effort is substantially the same as another proposal that was funded, is now being funded, or is pending with another Federal Agency, or another or the same DoD Component, you must reveal this on the Cover Sheet and provide the information required in Section 4.7.c(9).

     

    Awards by other Agencies

     

    Due to specific limitations on the amount of funding and number of awards that may be awarded to a particular firm per topic using SBIR/STTR program funds, Head of Agency Determinations are now required before a different agency may make an award using another agency's topic. This limitation does not apply to Phase III funding. Please contact your original sponsoring agency before submitting a Phase II proposal to an agency other than the one who sponsored the original topic.

     

    Transition from SBIR to STTR (or vice versa)

     

    Section 4(b)(1)(i) of the SBIR and the STTR Policy Directives provide that, at the agency's discretion, projects awarded a Phase I under a FY13 solicitation (and beyond) for SBIR may transition in Phase II to STTR and vice versa. A firm wishing to transfer from one program to another must contact their designated technical monitor to discuss the reasons for the request and the agency's ability to support the request. The transition may be proposed prior to award or during the performance of the Phase II effort. Agency disapproval of a request to change programs shall not be grounds for granting relief from any contractual performance requirement. All approved transitions between programs must be noted in the Phase II award or award modification signed by the contracting officer that indicates the removal or addition of the research institution and the revised percentage of work requirements.

     

    Phase II Option

     

    DARPA has implemented the use of a SBIR Phase II Option that may be exercised at the DARPA Program Manager's discretion to continue funding SBIR Phase II activities that will further mature the technology for insertion into a larger DARPA Program, DoD Acquisition Program, other Federal agency, or commercialization into the private sector. The statement of work for the SBIR Phase II Option MUST be included with the Phase II technical volume and should describe Phase II activities, over a 12 month period, that may lead to the successful demonstration of a product or technology. The statement of work for the option counts toward the 40-page limit for the Phase II technical volume. If selected, the government may elect not to include the option in the negotiated contract.

     

    Technical Assistance

     

    In accordance with the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 632), DARPA will authorize the recipient of a Phase II SBIR (from 13.1 solicitation and beyond) or STTR award (from 13.A solicitation and beyond) to purchase technical assistance services, such as access to a network of scientists and engineers engaged in a wide range of technologies, or access to technical and business literature available through on‐line data bases, for the purpose of assisting such concerns in:

    ·         making better technical decisions concerning such projects;

    ·         solving technical problems which arise during the conduct of such projects;

    ·         minimizing technical risks associated with such projects; and

    ·         developing and commercializing new commercial products and processes resulting from such projects.

     

    If you are interested in proposing use of a vendor for technical assistance, you must provide a cost breakdown under "Other Direct Costs (ODCs)" of the Cost Volume and provide a one page description of the vendor you will use and the technical assistance you will receive as the LAST page of the Technical Volume. This description will not count against the 20-page limit and will NOT be evaluated. The proposed amount may not exceed $5,000 per year and a total of $10,000 per Phase II contract. Approval of technical assistance is not guaranteed and is subject to review of the contracting officer.

     

    4.3 How to Submit

     

    Each Phase II proposal must be submitted through the DoD Electronic Submission Web site by the deadline specified in your notification letter (available on the DARPA SBIR/STTR Information Portal, SSIP). Direct to Phase II Proposals submitted in response to this solicitation must be submitted by January 22, 2014.  Each proposal submission must contain a Proposal Cover Sheet, Technical Volume, Cost Volume, and a Company Commercialization Report (see Section 4.7.e).

     

    4.4 Commercialization Strategy

     

    At a minimum, your commercialization strategy must address the following five questions:

    (1) What is the first product that this technology will go into?

    (2) Who will be the customers, and what is the estimated market size?

    (3) How much money will be needed to bring the technology to market, and how will that money be raised?

    (4) Does the company contain marketing expertise and, if not, how will that expertise be brought into the company?

    (5) Who are the proposing firm's competitors, and what is the price and/or quality advantage over those competitors?

    The commercialization strategy must also include a schedule showing the anticipated quantitative commercialization results from the Phase II project at one year after the start of Phase II, at the completion of Phase II, and after the completion of Phase II (i.e., amount of additional investment, sales revenue, etc.). After Phase II award, the company is required to report actual sales and investment data in its Company Commercialization Report (see Section 4.7.e) at least annually.

     

    In addition, each Phase II proposal must contain a five-page commercialization strategy as part of the technical proposal, addressing the following questions:

     

    1. Product Description/System Application – Identify the Commercial product(s) and/or DoD system(s) or system(s) under development or potential new systems that this technology will be/or has the potential to be integrated into.
    2. Advocacy Letters** – Feedback received from potential Commercial and/or DoD customers and other end-users regarding their interest in the technology to support their capability gaps.
    3. Letters of Intent/Commitment** – Relationships established, feedback received, support and commitment for the technology with one or more of the following: Commercial customer, DoD PM/PEO, a Defense Prime, or vendor/supplier to the Primes and/or other vendors/suppliers identified as having a potential role in the integration of the technology into fielded systems/products or those under development.
    4. Business Models/Procurement Mechanisms/Vehicles – Business models, procurement mechanisms, vehicles and, as relevant, commercial channels, and/or licensing/teaming agreements you plan to employ to sell into your targeted markets.

    a.       What is the business model you plan to adopt to generate revenue from your innovation?

    b.      Describe the procurement mechanisms, vehicles and channels you plan to employ to reach the targeted markets/customers.

    c.       If you plan to pursue a licensing model, what is your plan to identify potential licensees?

    1. Market/Customer Sets/Value Proposition – Describe the market and customer sets you propose to target, their size, and their key reasons they would consider procuring the technology.
    2. What is the current size of the broad market you plan to enter and the "niche" market opportunity you are addressing?
    3. What are the growth trends for the market and the key trends in the industry that you are planning to target?
      1. What features of your technology will allow you to provide a compelling value proposition?
      2. Have you validated the significance of these features and if not, how do you plan to validate?
    4. Competition Assessment – Describe the competition in these markets/customer sets and your anticipated advantage (e.g., function, performance, price, quality, etc.)
    5. Funding Requirements – List your targeted funding sources (e.g., federal, state and local, private (internal, loan, angel, venture capital, etc.) and your proposed plan and schedule to secure this funding. Provide anticipated funding requirements both during and after Phase II required to:

    ·         mature the technology

    ·         as required, mature the manufacturing processes

    ·         test and evaluate the technology

    ·         receive required certifications

    ·         secure patents, or other protections of intellectual property

    ·         manufacture the technology to bring the technology to market for use in operational environments

    ·         market/sell technology to targeted customers

    1. Sales Projections – Provide a schedule that outlines your anticipated sales projections and indicate when you anticipate breaking even.
    2. Expertise/Qualifications of Team/Company Readiness - Describe the expertise and qualifications of your management, marketing/business development and technical team that will support the transition of the technology from the prototype to the commercial market and into operational environments. Has this team previously taken similar products/services to market? If the present team does not have this needed expertise, how do you intend to obtain it? What is the financial history and health of your company (e.g., availability of cash, profitability, revenue growth, etc.)?

     

    The commercialization strategy must also include a schedule showing the quantitative commercialization results from the Phase II project that your company expects to report in its Company Commercialization Report Updates one year after the start of Phase II, at the completion of Phase II, and after the completion of Phase II (i.e., amount of additional investment, sales revenue, etc.).

     

    **Please note: In accordance with section 3-209 of DOD 5500.7-R, Joint Ethics Regulation, letters from government personnel will NOT be considered during the evaluation process.

     

    4.5 Marking Proprietary Proposal Information

     

    Offerors that include in their proposals data that they do not want disclosed to the public for any purpose, or used by the Government except for evaluation purposes, shall:

    1. Mark the first page of each Volume of the Submission with the following legend: "This proposal includes data that shall not be disclosed outside the Government and shall not be duplicated, used or disclosed - in whole or in part - for any purpose other than to evaluate this proposal. If, however, a contract is awarded to this offeror as a result of - or in connection with -the submission of this data, the Government shall have the right to duplicate, use, or disclose the data to the extent provided in the resulting contract. This restriction does not limit the Government's right to use information contained in this data if it is obtained from another source without restriction. The data subject to this restriction are contained in pages [insert numbers or other identification of sheets]"; and
    2. Mark each sheet of data it wishes to restrict with the following legend: "Use or disclosure of data contained on this page is subject to the restriction on the first page of this volume."

     

    The DoD assumes no liability for disclosure or use of unmarked data and may use or disclose such data for any purpose.

     

    Restrictive notices notwithstanding, proposals and final reports submitted through the DoD electronic submission website may be handled, for administrative purposes only, by support contractors. All support contractors are bound by appropriate non-disclosure agreements.

     

    4.6 Direct to Phase II

     

    15 U.S.C. §638(cc), as amended by NDAA FY12 Sec. 5106, PILOT TO ALLOW PHASE FLEXIBILITY, allows the Department of Defense to make an award to a small business concern under Phase II of the SBIR program with respect to a project, without regard to whether the small business concern was provided an award under Phase I of an SBIR program with respect to such project.

     

    DARPA is conducting a "Direct to Phase II" pilot implementation of this authority for this 14.1SBIR solicitation only and does not guarantee the pilot will be offered in future solicitations. Each eligible topic will indicate what documentation is required to determine if Phase I feasibility has been met and the technical requirements for a Direct to Phase II proposal.

     

    Not all DARPA topics are eligible for a Direct to Phase II award. Offerors must choose between submitting a Phase I proposal OR a Direct to Phase II proposal, and may not submit both for the same topic. DARPA reserves the right to not make any awards under the Direct to Phase II pilot. All other instructions remain in effect. Direct to Phase II proposals must follow the steps outlined below:

     

    STEP 1:

    1. Offerors must create a Phase I coversheet using the DoD Phase I Proposal submission system (follow the DoD Instructions for the Cover Sheet located in section 5.4.a).
    2. Offerors must upload the documentation that satisfies the Phase I feasibility requirement.  You must upload this documentation in the DoD Phase I Proposal submission system as the "Technical Volume" – DO NOT follow the technical volume format specified in the solicitation instructions for your justification, follow instructions specified within the topic).
    3. Offerors DO NOT upload a Phase I cost volume.
    4. The Phase I coversheet and applicable documentation must be submitted to http://dodsbir.com/submission by 6:00 (ET) on January 22, 2014.

     

    STEP 2:

    1. Offerors must submit a Phase II proposal using the DARPA Phase II proposal instructions in section 4.0 (beginning on page 9).
    2. The Phase II proposal must be submitted by 6AM (ET) on January 22, 2014.

     

    NOTE: Offerors are required to provide information demonstrating the scientific and technical merit and feasibility of a Phase I project.  DARPA will not evaluate the offeror's related Phase II proposal where it determines that the offeror has failed to demonstrate the scientific and technical merit and feasibility of the Phase I project.

     

    4.7 Phase II Proposal Instructions

     

    a.  Proposal Cover Sheet (Volume One)

     

    On the DoD Electronic Submission Web site, (www.dodsbir.net/submission/SignIn.asp), prepare the Proposal Cover Sheet. The cover sheet must include a brief technical abstract of no more than 200 words that describes the proposed R&D project with a discussion of anticipated benefits and potential commercial applications. Do not include proprietary or classified information in the Proposal Cover Sheet. If your proposal is selected for award, the technical abstract and discussion of anticipated benefits will be publicly released on the Internet. Once the Cover Sheets is saved, the system will assign a proposal number. You may edit the cover sheet as often as necessary until the solicitation closes.

     

    b.  Format of Technical Volume (Volume Two)

     

    1. Type of file: The Technical Volume must be a single Portable Document Format (PDF) file, including graphics. Perform a virus check before uploading the Technical Volume file. Do not lock or encrypt the uploaded file.

     

    1. Length: The Technical Volume is limited to 40 pages (and appendices not to exceed 20 pages).

     

    1. Layout: Number all pages of your proposal consecutively. If a virus is detected, it may cause rejection of the proposal. Offerors must submit a direct, concise, and informative research or research and development proposal of no more than 40 pages (no type smaller than 10-point on standard 8-1/2" x 11" paper with one inch margins). The header on each page of the technical proposal should contain your company name, topic number, and proposal number assigned by the DoD Electronic Submission Web site when the cover sheet was created. The header may be included in the one-inch margin.

     

    c.  Content of the Technical Volume (Volume Two)

     

    The Technical Volume should cover the following items in the order given below.

    1.      Significance of the Problem and Results of Phase I work. Define the specific technical problem or opportunity addressed and its importance. Discuss the objective of the Phase I effort, the type of research conducted, findings or results of this research and technical feasibility. (Begin on Page 3 of your proposal.)

     

    2.      Phase II Technical Objectives. Enumerate the specific objectives of the Phase II work, and describe the technical approach and methods to be used in meeting these objectives.

    a)      Phase II Statement of Work. The statement of work should provide an explicit, detailed description of the Phase II approach, indicate what is planned, how and where the work will be carried out, a schedule of major events and the final product to be delivered. The methods planned to achieve each objective or task should be discussed explicitly and in detail. This section should be a substantial portion of the total proposal.

    b)      Phase II OPTION Statement of Work. The statement of work should provide an explicit, detailed description of the activities planned during the Phase II option, if exercised. Include how and where the work will be carried out, a schedule of major events and the final product to be delivered. The methods planned to achieve each objective or task should be discussed explicitly and in detail.

     

    3.      Related Work. Describe significant activities directly related to the proposed effort, including any conducted by the principal investigator, the proposing firm, consultants or others. Describe how these activities interface with the proposed project and discuss any planned coordination with outside sources. The proposal must persuade reviewers of the proposer's awareness of the state of the art in the specific topic. Describe previous work not directly related to the proposed effort but similar. Provide the following: (1) short description, (2) client for which work was performed (including individual to be contacted and phone number) and (3) date of completion.

     

    4.      Relationship with Future Research or Research and Development.

    i.        State the anticipated results of the proposed approach if the project is successful.

    ii.      Discuss the significance of the Phase II effort in providing a foundation for Phase III research and development or commercialization effort.