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Aggression Psychology Research Papers

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  • Aggression and Violent Behavior, A Review Journal is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes substantive and integrative reviews, as well as summary reports of innovative ongoing clinical research programs on a wide range of topics germane to the field of aggression and violent behavior. Papers encompass a large variety of issues, populations, and domains, including homicide (serial, spree, and mass murder: sexual homicide), sexual deviance and assault (rape, serial rape, child molestation, paraphilias), child and youth violence (firesetting, gang violence, juvenile sexual offending), family violence (child physical and sexual abuse, child neglect, incest, spouse and elder abuse), genetic predispositions, and the physiological basis of aggression.

    Manuscripts that articulate disparate orientations will be welcomed, given that this journal will be cross-disciplinary and cross-theoretical. Indeed, papers will emanate from numerous disciplines, psychology, psychiatry, criminology, criminal justice, law, sociology, anthropology, genetics, social work, ethology, and physiology.

    Papers describing the study of aggression in normal, criminal, and psychopathological populations are acceptable. Reviews of analog investigations of aggression and animal models will be considered if the contribution is likely to lead to significant movement in the field. The emphasis, however, will be on innovativeness of presentation and clarity of thinking.

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